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Section II

Field Data Collection for Land Information Systems – A Case Study on Quantification of Resource Requirement for a GIS

Authors:

E. A. G. Chandramali ,

University of Moratuwa, LK
About E. A. G.

Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering

B.Sc. (Hons )in IT (SLIIT), M. Sc. in Civil Engineering.

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N. T. S. Wijesekera

University of Moratuwa, LK
About N. T. S.

Senior Professor of Civil Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering

Eng. (Prof.), B.Sc. Eng. (Sri Lanka), PG Dip.(Moratuwa), M. Eng. (Tokyo), D.Eng. (Tokyo), C. Eng., MICE (UK), FIE (Sri Lanka)

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Abstract

Field data collection is the most important component for application development. Field data significantly affect the results of a research or a project. Therefore it would consume a substantial period of time unless field data collection is suitably designed, properly planned and executed with minimum gap fill data collection efforts. It is important for field data collection programs to carefully ascertain the required data, accuracy requirements and incorporate suitable verification tools. In order to achieve success of this process it is necessary to have a well organized methodology to evaluate available methods and tools for data collection, gap filling, verification and evaluation. This must be achieved through a good literature review, and then selecting and creating suitable methods, requirements and resources for data collection. The study area is around university of Moratuwa in Moratuwa DSD of Sri Lanka. It is a semi urban area of approximately 2.5km2 with nearly 6000 buildings and 300 roads. The area was divided into ten zones for data collection purpose. Georeferenced Google images, a pre tested data collection sheet, printed maps, Magellan Triton Handheld GPS and 38 data collectors were the resources used for the data collection process to capture spatial data. Total number of buildings collected from the survey is 5175 which covered the 17.97% of the extent. 469 Roads with a total length of 52,920m and classified into six road types covered 5.99% of the total area. The data capturing rate was approximately 5.5ha of land area and 3.8% of building units per averaged person per day. To capture these data, collectors traveled 162.5km within the data collection area consuming 102 person days. This research provides a systematic approach and guideline quantifications supporting GIS planners to prepare project estimations.
How to Cite: Chandramali, E.A.G. & Wijesekera, N.T.S., (2012). Field Data Collection for Land Information Systems – A Case Study on Quantification of Resource Requirement for a GIS. Engineer: Journal of the Institution of Engineers, Sri Lanka. 45(4), pp.51–64. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/engineer.v45i4.6926
Published on 24 Oct 2012.
Peer Reviewed

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